MotherhoodRaising a baby

What’s the Best Position for Breastfeeding?

The best position for you is the one where you and your baby are both comfortable and relaxed, and you don’t have to strain to hold the position or keep nursing. Here are some common positions for breastfeeding your baby:

Cradle Position

Rest the side of your baby’s head in the crook of your elbow with their whole body facing you. Position your baby’s belly against your body so they feel fully supported. Your other, “free” arm can wrap around to support your baby’s head and neck — or reach through your baby’s legs to support the lower back.

Football Position

Line your baby’s back along your forearm to hold your baby like a football, supporting the head and neck in your palm. This works best with newborns and small babies. It’s also a good position if you’re recovering from a cesarean birth and need to protect your belly from the pressure or weight of your baby.

Side-Lying Position

This position is great for night feedings in bed. Side-lying also works well if you’re recovering from an episiotomy, an incision to widen the vaginal opening during delivery. Use pillows under your head to get comfortable. Then snuggle close to your baby and use your free hand to lift your breast and nipple into your baby’s mouth. Once your baby is correctly “latched on,” support the head and neck with your free hand so there’s no twisting or straining to keep nursing.

Cross-Cradle Hold

Sit straight in a comfortable chair that has armrests. Hold your baby in the crook of your arm that’s opposite the breast you will use to feed them. Support their head with your hand. Bring your baby across your body so your tummies face each other. Use your other hand to cup your breast in a U-shaped hold. Bring your baby’s mouth to your breast and cradle them close, and don’t lean forward.

Laid-Back Position

This position, also called biological nurturing, is a lot like it sounds. It’s meant to tap into the natural breastfeeding instincts you and your baby have. Lean back, but not flat, on a couch or bed. Have good support for your head and shoulders. Hold your baby so your entire fronts touch. Let your baby take any position they’re comfortable in as long as their cheek rests near your breast. Help your baby latch on if they need it.

Source
webmd

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button
Please complete this form to exercise certain rights you may have in connection with the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) . Once we have received your request and verified your identity we will process your request as soon as possible.