cramps and pains

What Are Uterine Fibroids

Fibroids are abnormal growths that develop in or on a woman’s uterus. Sometimes these tumors become quite large and cause severe abdominal pain and heavy periods. In other cases, they cause no signs or symptoms at all. The growths are typically benign, or noncancerous. The cause of fibroids is unknown.

Fibroids are also known by the following names:

  • leiomyomas
  • myomas
  • uterine myomas
  • fibromas

According to the Office on Women’s Health, up to 80 percent of women have them by the age of 50. However, most women don’t have any symptoms and may never know they have fibroids.

What Are the Different Types of Fibroids?

The type of fibroid a woman develops depends on its location in or on the uterus.

Intramural Fibroids

Intramural fibroids are the most common type of fibroid. These types appear within the muscular wall of the uterus. Intramural fibroids may grow larger and can stretch your womb.

Sub Serosal Fibroids

Sub serosal fibroids form on the outside of your uterus, which is called the serosa. They may grow large enough to make your womb appear bigger on one side.

Pedunculated Fibroids

Sub serosal tumors can develop a stem, a slender base that supports the tumor. When they do, they’re known as pedunculated fibroids.

Submucosal Fibroids

These types of tumors develop in the middle muscle layer, or myometrium, of your uterus. Submucosal tumors aren’t as common as the other types.

What Causes Fibroids?

It’s unclear why fibroids develop, but several factors may influence their formation.

Hormones

Estrogen and progesterone are the hormones produced by the ovaries. They cause the uterine lining to regenerate during each menstrual cycle and may stimulate the growth of fibroids.

Family History

Fibroids may run in the family. If your mother, sister, or grandmother has a history of this condition, you may develop it as well.

Pregnancy

Pregnancy increases the production of estrogen and progesterone in your body. Fibroids may develop and grow rapidly while you’re pregnant.

Who Is at Risk for Fibroids?

Women are at greater risk for developing fibroids if they have one or more of the following risk factors:

  • pregnancy
  • a family history of fibroids
  • age of 30 or older
  • African-American
  • a high body weight
Source
Health line

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