Menstrual Cycle

How Surgery Can Help Menorrhagia

Surgery may be an option if medication doesn’t relieve your symptoms.

Before recommending a specific procedure, your doctor will consider:

  • How severe your symptoms are
  • If an underlying cause is responsible
  • Whether you plan to conceive

You may need surgical treatment for menorrhagia if medical therapy is unsuccessful.

Treatment options include:

Dilation and curettage (D&C).

In this procedure, your doctor opens (dilates) your cervix and then scrapes or suctions tissue from the lining of your uterus to reduce menstrual bleeding. Although this procedure is common and often treats acute or active bleeding successfully, you may need additional D&C procedures if menorrhagia recurs.

Uterine artery embolization.

For women whose menorrhagia is caused by fibroids, the goal of this procedure is to shrink any fibroids in the uterus by blocking the uterine arteries and cutting off their blood supply. During uterine artery embolization, the surgeon passes a catheter through the large artery in the thigh (femoral artery) and guides it to your uterine arteries, where the blood vessel is injected with materials that decrease blood flow to the fibroid.

Focused ultrasound surgery.

Similar to uterine artery embolization, focused ultrasound surgery treats bleeding caused by fibroids by shrinking the fibroids. This procedure uses ultrasound waves to destroy the fibroid tissue. There are no incisions required for this procedure.

Myomectomy.

This procedure involves surgical removal of uterine fibroids. Depending on the size, number and location of the fibroids, your surgeon may choose to perform the myomectomy using open abdominal surgery, through several small incisions (laparoscopically), or through the vagina and cervix (hysteroscopic ally).

Endometrial ablation.

This procedure involves destroying (ablating) the lining of your uterus (endometrium). The procedure uses a laser, radiofrequency or heat applied to the endometrium to destroy the tissue.

After endometrial ablation, most women have much lighter periods. Pregnancy after endometrial ablation has many associated complications. If you have endometrial ablation, the use of reliable or permanent contraception until menopause is recommended.

Endometrial resection.

This surgical procedure uses an electrosurgical wire loop to remove the lining of the uterus. Both endometrial ablation and endometrial resection benefit women who have very heavy menstrual bleeding. Pregnancy isn’t recommended after this procedure.

Hysterectomy.

Hysterectomy — surgery to remove your uterus and cervix — is a permanent procedure that causes sterility and ends menstrual periods. Hysterectomy is performed under anesthesia and requires hospitalization. Additional removal of the ovaries (bilateral oophorectomy) may cause premature menopause.

Many of these surgical procedures are done on an outpatient basis. Although you may need a general anesthetic, it’s likely that you can go home later on the same day. An abdominal myomectomy or a hysterectomy usually requires a hospital stay.

When menorrhagia is a sign of another condition, such as thyroid disease, treating that condition usually results in lighter periods.

Source
Health lineMayo Clinic

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